Sunday, January 05, 2014

Is the revolving door a problem?

Lobby-a-palooza! New year brings new turn of the revolving door


48 comments:

Anna Aiuppa said...

The revolving door could potentially become an issue, as some political experts worry of the formation of an unhealthy relationship between private business and the government, due to the granting of reciprocated privileges to the detriment of the nation which could potentially lead to issues with regulations.

Justin Jezuit said...

I believe the revolving door could be a problem, and it is a good thing there is a proposal to " Stop the revolving door in the Washington Act". An extension in the cooling off period could help others in the long run because it will break a cycle.

Evan Warwick said...

I believe that the revolving door could potentially be a problem because of the relationship between private corporations and the government. I also agree with Justin in that an extension of the "cooling off period" could maybe help others in that it would break a cycle.

Donald Carpenter said...

The revolving door is a problem because politicians may be a afraid to enact any legislation that hurts business while office because they want lucrative lobbying careers later. We need politicians who are willing to work on the budget and deficit without being controlled by special interests to spend more money or give tax breaks.

Katie Wirch said...

I feel that the revolving door could become an issue, because of the potential of a bad relationship with the government and private corporations. An extension of the cooling off period would be best for all involved.

Erika Baldwin said...

I also agree that the revolving door could become an issue because of the influence private businesses may be able to orchestrate. It is imperative that the government focus on legislation and not other interests or a lobbying career in the future, to ensure that the needs of the American people are accurately reflected. The revolving door could interfere with this.

Nicholas Staniszewski said...

I think that the revolving door is only a problem when the system is corrupted for the problem. The revolving door is a great idea when the ex-Congressman are lobbying for the people they used to represent because they are now closer and more aware of the problems now that they are not stuck in Congress. Also, the ex-Congressman could have a great piece of legislation they have wanted to pass for a long time that they weren't able to pass due to the make up of the House and Senate, so extending the cool off period could hurt potentially great ideas. The revolving door is bad, however, when a Congressman lobbies solely to benefit a particular business or industry and uses their influence for that industry. Perhaps if Congress set rules on where a lobbyist can get finiancial support from, there wouldn't be corruption.

Jared Baldwin said...

I believe that the revolving door could potentially become a problem, as there could be an issue between private businesses and the federal government. We cannot focus on other issues, the important ones in the eyes of citizens need to be accomplished.

Jake Aperi said...

I think that the revolving door will become a problem, because there will eventually be an issue between private businesses and the government. It will interfere with the big issues getting accomplished, which is what the citizens don't want to happen. The revolving door would create a problem with other small issues.

Kelsee York said...

I think the revolving door could become a major issue. Private businesses could form close relationships with the government which could be potentially dangerous. The main purpose of the government is to work through legislation, and this just gets in the way of that principle.

Jacob arndt said...

I believe the revolving door will be a major problem. This is because in the future problems between the government and small businesses will form and then there will just be more problems that our legislation will have to deal with.

CharissaDahl said...

I think that the revolving door is a potential problem for our country. If the government forms strong bonds or relationships with big businesses and corporations, this could be very dangerous for our country. I agree with the prior comments about the "cooling off period."

Kelsey Cybell said...

The revolving door could become an issue, since a close relationship between business and government may cause one to unfairly influence the other.

Amy Rothwell said...

Calling the revolving door a problem is calling all lobbying a problem. Senators and Representatives who are no longer legislators at that time have the right to become lobbyists--just like any other citizen. The only other advantage they bring is the experience within the legislative chambers. While the revolving door does increase the likelihood of detrimental relationships between government and private industry, this could be said of all lobbying involved with private industry. I believe that the revolving door has the potential to be a problem, as with all lobbying and whenever private industry is involved with the government.

ben dewinter said...

I think that the revolving door is a problem because, congress members will make their decisions based on what former congressman want. Also it could cause an issue between the national government and private businesses. However I feel that there is no law that can restrict the revolving door, former congressman have the right to lobby.

Tori Navarro said...

The revolving door is a potential problem. In order to avoid a disaster I believe that an extension of the cooling off period would break the cycle. the bad relationship between private corporations and the government could be a reoccurring problem unless acted upon.

Tony Lopez said...

I believe the revolving door could potentially become a problem if former congressman decide to abuse their right to lobby. With former congressman having experience in legislation, they most likely know what it takes to get their ideas to be followed. Add this to the money that business corporations can add to back that congressman and it could lead to a very powerful relationship in which an old congressman can lobby solely for the ideals of the business they represent. There are also benefits to the revolving door in which former congressman get the chance to put forward ideas after they have been more in touch with the people they represent. As long as businesses do not influence lobbying of ex congressman to much then the revolving door will not be a problem.

Leah Henriksen said...

I think the revolving door could become a problem. Though the sense of power in both sectors may be rewarding to members of the revolving door, it may not benefit the population. The bond between business and government could be dangerous, because they may put the needs of one over the other, compromising the security of the United States.

Evan Jahnke said...

I believe the revolving door could become a huge problem in the relationship between the government and private businesses. Each one will want to have more power, trying to bring the other one down.

Brandon Glandt said...

I believe the revolving door could be a problem. It is a good idea for a proposal to stop the revolving door. This could lead to a problem in private businesses and the federal government. Each side will try to claim more power over the other possibly bringing the opposing side down.

Allison Menako said...

The reveloving door could potentially create a lot of issues in the United States. It would cause problems between private businesses and the government. Having this could cause each one to get more influence or power over eachother.

Kelli Kontney said...

The revolving door is a potential problem for the government's relationship with the private sector. The new budget should work on the economy's huge deficit and should not be controlled by the interests of business' in the private sector.

Kelli Kontney said...

The revolving door is a potential problem for the government's relationship with the private sector. The new budget should work on the economy's huge deficit and should not be controlled by the interests of business' in the private sector.

Keely Smith said...

In my opinion, the revolving door could become a problem due to the fact that politicians might not enact legislation that hurt businesses, and the relationships between corporations and the government. The important issues need to be accomplished and these issues ill become a distraction. Therefore, the revolving door would create problems with small issues. An extension of the cooling off period could be best for all of the people involved.

abigail wallace said...

I feel that the revolving door will become a later problem down the road. Small business and the government will come close together causing yet another issue. It will be a constant battle for power.

Kaitlyn L said...

between private corporations (businesses) and the government, the revolving door would become a problem. These close relationships that could develop would make ideals worse. Government must work through legislation, and a revolving door would disrupt that.

Jessica Klamecki said...

I think the revolving door will be a problem in the future because in the future their is a possibility to have a bad relationship between the government and private corporations. I also agree that the cooling off period would help this situation.

Ashley Olszewski said...

Like several of the other comments I'm seeing, I think the revolving door could be a problem. There's an unfair disadvantage in future legislation that could benefit the general public but not be passed because of the skepticism about future lobbying careers. It's an unnecessary addition to putting a hold on future legislation.

Joelle Wayer said...

I also agree that the revolving door could potentially become a problem. As most people have already mentioned, an unhealthy relationship between the government and private businesses could result. This is because the rewards the revolving door could possibly grant its members may not be beneficial to the overall population. This relationship could become dangerous, as the needs of private businesses may be met over more important, pressing issues. Therefore, I believe the "cooling off" period would be a good course of action.

Becca Penn said...

I think the revolving door could become a problem for the federal government with businesses. Some private businesses may close themselves off to the federal government. The government should be starting the new year with a focus on legislation rather than lobbying.

Ben Ziolkowski said...

The revolving door can have positive and negative features. This can be a good thing because it allows people who have recently been in office and have a better understanding on current political issues to influence the people in a way that will benefit our nation. However, one can argue whether or not lobbying is a good thing or bad thing. It also depends on what lobbyists are lobbying about.

Ian Hintz said...

I believe that the revolving door is a very good idea in theory. Someone in an industry is hired by the government and is then allowed to influence legislation with their expertise. This helps the industry because the new official will know exactly how to benefit it. This also helps the government run faster and more effectively. However, if either side become greedy and abuses the new found power, the revolving door becomes dangerous. The government meant to help the public can find itself entangled in the problems and responsibilities of one industry or even a single private business. If the regulations are strict enough and there is a system of checks and balances, I think the revolving door system could be a good policy.

Noah Golden said...

The revolving door could become an issue later because of the possibilities of the of the private businesses and the government's relationship. A larger cooling off period could be very beneficial.

Daniel Baumann said...

I think lobbying is a healthy political process and therefore so is the revolving door. Obviously, like anything, it can be abused. I believe former Senators and Representatives have the right to become lobbyists like any other citizen. While the revolving door does increase the likelihood of detrimental relationships between government and private industry, this could be said of all lobbying involved with private industry.

Justin Myers said...

Due to the relationship between the government and private corporations, the revolving door could present a problem. As others have said, the cooling off period could be beneficial as it would break a cycle.

Austin L said...

The revolving door will be a problem, because it will create problems between the government and private business.And ultimately lead to corruption. But on the other hand, if it was regulated properly, I think it will do its purpose as intended.

Tom Schneider said...

I believe the revolving door could create a problem because of the relationship between private businesses and the government. Government should be focusing on legislation rather than the interests of lobbyists.

Ellie Tadych said...

I think this could potentially cause a problem because some private businesses will form a close relationship to the federal government and it will be a constant battle for power.

Ellie Tadych said...

I think this could potentially cause a problem because some private businesses will form a close relationship to the federal government and it will be a constant battle for power.

Justin Latawiec said...

I think the revolving door could be good but it will eventually cause problems because of the private business and government. This will lead to fighting over power which will just distract the government from what really matters.

Jessica Klamecki said...

Katie Wirch, what specific problems and disagreements do you think will cause the most conflict between the government and private corporations?

Emily Hamer said...

@Kelsee York. I think that the revolving door could become a problem too, but how do you think that this differs from lobbying? Is there that big of a difference? Couldn't both of them be bad?

Mr. Bretzmann said...

@Emily Clearly the revolving door is different than lobbying. It is those who go through the door that become lobbyists. The question is whether or not this is acceptable. Should those, who moments ago, were in control of the policy as a member of Congress now be lobbying their former colleagues for a huge fee because of their access. Is that fair to common, ordinary, everyday citizens?

Tori Navarro said...

@Evan Warwick why would the relationship between the private corporations and government cause a problem? I agree just would like to know your opinion.

Mitchell Kwapick said...

@JustinLatawiec do you think it is possible for the government to avoid this problem completely? Is there any way to avoid all the problems that distract from the government's abilities to work efficiently?

Allie Krumrai said...

Justin Latawiec how would revolving door cause a distraction in regards to the government?

Paul Kremer said...

I think there is could be an issue between private business and the government. An extension of the cooling off period would possibly help others and break the cycle. Each side will try to claim more people and it will end up hurting both in the end.

Haley D. said...

I think this could cause a problem because some private/ small businesses will form a close relationship with the federal government and that would result in a battle for power all the time between the two.